Tiny new satellites can guaranty that we will not all die from global warming

by Linda Kaidan

Tiny new satellites or Nanosatellites halt global warming
NASA Nanosatellite Cube Launcher 2013

Tiny new satellites are being developed at MIT’s Space Propulsion Laboratory. This breakthrough technology can support the delivery of solar shades in space to prevent earth’s atmosphere from continuously heating up.  With advances in nanotech, satellites can be as tiny as half an inch cubed. The tininess is important as it makes the cost of launching the them comparatively small.

Tiny new satellites called nanosatellites are a foundation technology for global warming prevention

This emerging generation of satellites is much smarter than those we have now. They have highly effective navigation and propulsion systems for ease of placement, and can return to earth on their own without adding to Earth’s orbiting space junk colonies.

Each satellite can deliver a space shade cluster capable of covering huge areas with reflective lightweight fabric that can be repositioned to precisely control the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth. With space shades that we can easily move and control, we can accurately regulate how much heat our atmosphere absorbs from the sun.

Nanosatellite Launchers are under development by NASA

Space shades don’t solve all our problems. We need to stop polluting our soil, water and air while cleaning up the mess we’ve already made.  Nanosatellite delivered space shades can give us the time we need to recover from our ongoing climate change disaster. Perhaps this will become a major step in planetary weather control. The first flight of NASA’s Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System took place in November 2013.

 

Author:

This blog is my perspective on dwelling in our small village nestled among beautiful forests, farms and open landscapes. Educated in Israel and the US, I have an MS in Computer Science. My viewpoint has been shaped by world travel, friends and benefactors both strangers and people I know. Linda Kaidan